Knowledge

COVID-19 and NCDs

COVID-19 and Indigenous Peoples' Rights

Article

The COVID-19 pandemic is disproportionately affecting indigenous peoples, exacerbating underlying structural inequalities and pervasive discrimination. These serious impacts need to be specifically addressed in the response to and aftermath of this crisis.1

Published by: United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Comissioner

Policy Brief of the UN Secretary-General: A Disability-Inclusive Response to COVID-19

Policy brief

The global crisis of COVID-19 is deepening pre-existing inequalities, exposing the extent of exclusion and highlighting that work on disability inclusion is imperative. People with disabilities—one billion people— are one of the most excluded groups in our society and are among the hardest hit in this crisis in terms of fatalities.

Published by: United Nations

COVID-19 and beyond: banning tobacco and e-cigarettes in public places is a public health must

Article

There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand smoke Following the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic around the world, 15 countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region took a bold decision to ban waterpipe use temporarily in public places. This is in addition to the two countries that had already banned it previously, making the total number of countries that have banned waterpipe use in public places 17. Waterpipe use was identified as a possible means for the spread of COVID-19 due to its communal use, which involves the sharing of a single mouthpiece and hose, and customary use in social gatherings, which makes physical distancing impossible.

Published by: World Health Organization

Tobacco and waterpipe use increases the risk of COVID-19

Guide

This Q&A is based on, and benefitted from, the most recent evidence on COVID-19 and tobacco use. Although evidence is still accumulating on the links between COVID-19 and tobacco, waterpipe and e-products use, current research suggests a possible association between smoking and increasing severity of COVID-19 symptoms. Therefore, it is important to raise awareness in this area. There are still research gaps that need to be addressed. As more research data become available, the Q&A will be updated accordingly.

Published by: World Health Organization

Q&A: Tobacco and COVID-19

Guide

Questions and answers on tobacco and COVID-19.

Published by: World Health Organization

Smoking and COVID-19: Scientific Brief

Article

The harms of tobacco use are well-established. Tobacco causes 8 million deaths every year from cardiovascular diseases, lung disorders, cancers, diabetes, and hypertension.1 Smoking tobacco is also a known risk factor for severe disease and death from many respiratory infections.2-4 In the COVID-19 pandemic, questions have been asked about clinical outcomes for smokers, and whether they are equally susceptible to infection, and if nicotine has any biological effect on the SAR-CoV-2 virus (the virus that causes COVID-19)

Published by: World Health Organization

Help frontline workers cope with stress during the COVID-19 pandemic: Suggested actions for team managers

Guide

Going to work during the COVID-19 pandemic has put frontline workers under enormous and unprecedented pressure, endangering their physical and psychological well-being and social well-being. Employees subject to increased or prolonged stress become more susceptible to frequent absenteeism or lack of productivity during work, accidents and errors. In the course of the COVID- 19 pandemic, the foregoing may cause quality and safety of care, breach of protocols and guidelines, increased risk of infection, and weakened health system and emergency response teams to combat the pandemic. While frontline workers are responsible for caring for themselves and expressing their needs and concerns, organizations, managers and health administrators have to make many efforts to prevent and reduce stress and take care of the mental health of frontline workers.
 

Published by: World Health Organization

Help frontline workers cope with stress during the COVID-19 pandemic: suggested actions on peers

Guide

As a peer, you have several ways in which you can support your colleagues to deal with stress, maintain their mental health, or control specific situations during the COVID-19 pandemic that put frontline workers under enormous strain and alter their mental health at work. This is important for their physical and psychological safety and social well-being. Peers can provide personal and professional support to each other in distinct ways, enabling a collective solution to problems, which is essential in enhancing your personal well-being and your satisfaction with unprecedented emergency situations. Peer support is not only beneficial to group performance and work relationships, it can also do your job. Here are some measures you can take to support your peers to deal with stress during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Published by: World Health Organization

Front Line Workers Procedures that Font Workers Can Set Things Right to Know Latest Updates Avoid Hyper-information and COVID19: Dealing with Stress

Guide

Going to work during the Covid 19-pandemic has put frontline workers under enormous and unprecedented pressure, putting their physical and psychological integrity and social well-being at risk. Prolonged exposure to stress may have many consequences detrimental to the emotional and psychological well-being of frontline workers.

Published by: World Health Organization

Welcome to the Partnership for Healthy Cities COVID-19 Response Center

Database

Cities are at the forefront of the COVID-19 crisis. The Partnership for Healthy Cities COVID-19 Response Center is home to practical guidance and tools to support cities in four technical areas: Surveillance and Epidemiology, Communications, Public Health and Social Measures, Legal and Ethical Considerations.

Published by: Partnership for Healthy Cities

Policy Brief: COVID-19 and the Need for Action on Mental Health

Policy brief

Although the COVID-19 crisis is, in the first instance, a physical health crisis, it has the seeds of a major mental health crisis as well, if action is not taken. Good mental health is critical to the functioning of society at the best of times. It must be front and centre of every country’s response to and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. The mental health and wellbeing of whole societies have been severely impacted by this crisis and are a priority to be addressed urgently.

Published by: United Nations

World Health Data Platform

Database

The latest data and reports including the Global Health Observatory, Triple Billion targets, COVID-19 situation, and equity monitoring. 

 

Published by: World Health Organization

WHO statement: Tobacco use and COVID-19

Publication

Tobacco kills more than 8 million people globally every year. More than 7 million of these deaths are from direct tobacco use and around 1.2 million are due to non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke. Tobacco smoking is a known risk factor for many respiratory infections and increases the severity of respiratory diseases. A review of studies by public health experts convened by WHO on 29 April 2020 found that smokers are more likely to develop severe disease with COVID-19, compared to non-smokers.

Published by: World Health Organization

COVID-19 and the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and receptor blockers

Article

Concerns exists that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) increase susceptibility to coronavirus SARS CoV-2 (the viral agent that causes the disease COVID-19) and the likelihood of severe COVID-19 illness. These concerns are based on considerations of biological plausibility, and the observation that there is an overrepresentation of patients with hypertension and other cardiovascular comorbidities among patients with COVID-19 who have poor outcomes.

Published by: World Health Organization

Community-based health care, including outreach and campaigns,in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic

Guide

The COVID-19 pandemic is challenging health systems across the world. Rapidly increasing demand for care of people with COVID-19 is compounded by fear, misinformation and limitations on the movement of people and supplies that disrupt the delivery of frontline health care for all people.

Published by: World Health Organization

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